RHM0013 – Are You Owning Your Role?

bossWhether you stepping into a new position or actively working towards your next promotion, there are some steps you can take to make sure you are fully leaning in to your role. This solo episode is all about taking ownership, and here are some quick notes from the podcast (check out the full audio here!):

  1. Check your mindset. Are you still behaving as if you haven’t been promoted? What kinds of demands are you making in this new position? What types of conversations are you having with your coworkers? If you want respect in your new position, it might be time to elevate the way you look at yourself. (For more on this, check out episode 11 on Integrity at Work!)
  2. Delegate. Delegate. Delegate. One of the quickest ways to stay mired in an old position is to insist on doing the same tasks. If you have been promoted, it’s time to let go. Keep in mind that when you hold on to work that is beneath you, you are also holding up the growth of people on your team who are junior to you.
  3. Where can you stretch? Can you find ways to improve the status quo? Demonstrate your value by becoming the person in your office who can be relied on to take things to the next level.
  4. Ask for what you are worth. As you move into new positions and gain experience, your value to an organization should also shift. Don’t be afraid of making your desires known, whether you are negotiating for a higher salary or more responsibility. You will never receive what you don’t ask for!

Looking for more great content? Check out my blog for more tips, resources, and inspiration for getting empowered at work.

 

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RHM012 – How to Give Criticism at Work

rushhourSo you notice there is a problem at work, how do you bring it to your supervisor’s attention without being perceived as complaining? We discuss this question in this week’s solo episode on the Rush Hour Mentor podcast. Grab the episode here: bit.ly/rushhourmentor.

 

 

 

 

A few suggestions for giving criticism at work:

  1. Don’t make it personal. Once you bring personal politics into a work complaint, your conversation will shift to dealing with a person rather than an issue.
  2. Document, document, document! Your argument will be much stronger if you can provide proof. Get things in writing when you can, and keep track of dates and incidents.
  3. Offer solutions. An excellent way to avoid being seen as a complainer is to do the work of coming up with solutions.
  4. Get support. If you aren’t getting traction with your direct supervisor, brainstorm with other trusted colleagues. It’s possible that you aren’t the only one who has noticed an issue and that others are willing to support you in seeking solutions.
  5. Don’t take it personally. At the end of the day, if you’ve done everything listed above and still don’t receive the support you deserve, don’t internalize that feedback. You are responsible for yourself at the end of the day, and if others won’t listen to reason, it is not your fault.

Resource: A book that I recommend for navigating tough discussions is Verbal Judo: The Gentle Art of Persuasion by George Thompson.

Have you given criticism to your supervisors? What worked? What didn’t? Let me know your thoughts!

 

RHM009 – So Long 2016….

rushhourThis year has had its ups and downs for sure, but in spite of all of the challenges, it was definitely a transformational year for me. In this solo episode, I take a look back at 2016, and provide some quick tips for goal-setting in 2017.

A few tips on setting goals:

  1. Pull forward goals that appear on your list every year but have yet to happen. List them again, because the goals you list repeatedly are the ones you care most deeply about achieving.
  2. Add a stretch goal or two for 2017. When I have set stretch goals in the past, I have always been surprised how close I came to meeting or exceeding that goal by the end of the year. Tell the universe that you are ready for a challenge, and you’ll be amazed how things begin to shift!
  3. Add smaller goals that you are likely to achieve. Small wins add up and can help you stay motivated throughout the year. Set yourself up for success by including a goal or two that is well within your reach and make it happen.
  4. Create a ‘theme’ for your year. I like to set a three-word theme for each year that will guide my decision-making and motivate me all year long. When you select the words that will guide your year, put them somewhere visible (like on your refrigerator or your desk at work) to be reminded of the intentions you set for the coming year.
  5. Write it all down. Something amazing happens when you take thoughts from abstract to concrete by putting them on paper. It forces you to be accountable, and gives you a record to look back too at the end of the year to track your progress.

Next year can absolutely be your best year, so why not get started now? I’ll be back after the New Year with all new episodes of the Rush Hour Mentor podcast. So until then, Happy Holidays!

RHM003 – Killing Passive Language

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In today’s solo episode, Rush Hour Mentor host Monica Clark discusses the challenge of passive language in the workplace.

Some examples of this type of language include inserting words like ‘just’ into emails to avoid seeming overbearing or difficult, and apologizing when you have no reason to.

A few tips for combatting passive language in the workplace:

  • Pause before hitting ‘send’ to check for passive language in your written communication.
  • Write it out before you deliver the message.
  • Don’t beat yourself up for using passive language.

A great resource to address passive language and assertion in the workplace is Playing Big by Tara Mohr. Mohr offers practice guidance for how to take up more space in the world and push past our limitations.

You can also check out Monica’s blog at www.perceptionpractice.com for more articles and resources on empowerment in the workplace.